Sunday, 1 October 2017

At Talavera we stole Boney’s eagle (not this time you didn’t!)

Yesterday Tony, Goya and I convened in the drawing room at châteaux Foy to refight the battle of Talavera on Tony’s sumptuous wargame table. Tony had devised a clever three way player mechanism for C&CN that enabled each of us to have an independent command. Goya took the part of Arthur Wellesley, Tony played Cuesta and I took on the mantle of Marshal Victor (I thought the name sounded promising).

Tony’s clever system meant that I was able to play two cards per turn allowing me far more coordination than I would have had in a regular game of C&CN. The allies also played two cards but frustratingly for them it was only one each and in differing sectors of the table making it much more difficult to coordinate actions. The result was a French victory in a game that was neck and neck right to the last turn.

The drawing room at chateaux Foy (note the radiogram on
the dresser).
This is Cuesta at Talavera issuing his one and only
order "Hurry up and wait lads!"
"I think we should move away from this tree it seems to attract
French cannon fire, perhaps over there?"
I managed to assemble a decent force of cavalry on my right
flank and they were instrumental in the eventual French victory.
That's me, Marshal Victor, next to the King of Spain (on the
white horse).
French infantry massing in the centre of the field. It takes time
to organise a big attack in C&CN but the ability to play 2 cards
per turn certainly helped things along.
My plan was to feint in front of Talavera to prevent Cuesta from
sending troops to reinforce Wellesley. It worked like a dream
although perhaps Cuesta never had any intention of helping
the British out!
The attack in the centre finally gets underway. Each of those
hill hexes across the stream are worth 1VP to me if I can
occupy them.
The fighting fizzles out in front of Talavera although the
Spanish did make a couple of local counter-attacks.
A view from the British left flank. The 15th chasseurs (bottom right)
have just seen off 2 enemy units and captured one of the hill hexes.
These lads definitely qualified for 'man of the match' and were
still on the field at the end of play.
One of Tony's splendid units, Les Higgins figures I think.
I managed to bring up some heavy cavalry to support my left
flank whilst gradually moving some of the infantry there
towards the centre to reinforce my main attack.
This cavalry clash was an exciting affair of to and fro eventually
resulting in a big fro for the British who were wiped out.
Late in the afternoon and there is not a single British soldier left on the
ridge. I'd like to say this was a clever tactic employed by Wellesley to use
reverse slopes but it had more to do with British troops running away.
With the ridge vacated I was able to exploit the situation by moving
forward and occupying enough hill hexes to win the day.

Thanks to Tony for hosting another truly superb game and to Goya for once again letting his British infantry run away (and also for not pushing me off the Fourth Bridge on the way home as had been suggested in the heat of battle). I’m looking forward to the next one!

 And soon we were transported through hell and its fury
Through smoke and through fire, through shot and through flame
And at Telavera we stole Boney's Eagle
And in that short time we were heroes of Spain

4 comments:

Heinz-Ulrich von Boffke said...

The game looks like it was a blast, if you'll pardon the wretchedly poor pun.

Best Regards,

Stokes

Stryker said...

Yes Stokes there was quite a blast if you were stood on the ridge with Wellesley!

Wellington Man said...

Well played, Ian!

How interesting and unusual to see perfidious Albion on the run, and from a ridgeline too!

Stryker said...

WM - I have to say I really enjoyed this game (and not just because of the result). It was nice to actually have a plan and see it work. It was also most gratifying to see the interaction between Cuesta and Wellesley which varied between slightly tetchy and panicky! Of all the C&CN games I've played this felt the most like a 'proper' wargame due in no small part by Tony's superb figures and terrain.