Sunday, 25 June 2017

A new billet

Back in the early 70s I had a total of four model buildings for use with my Napoleonic armies. Two Superquick ones (including the church as here), an Airfix La Haye Sainte and one Airfix cottage. The Airfix cottage was a real pain to assemble as the bits didn’t go together properly and mine fell apart several times before the polystyrene cement finally dried. The finished item was forever a bit on the wobbly side.

It was only recently that I realised that this cottage, together with several other Airfix buildings, was still in production from a company called Dapol using the original moulds. They’re made in Wales from recycled plastic which means you can feel very good about yourself if you buy one as you are both helping the environment and Wales at the same time.

Having purchased one I was relieved to find that it went together very easily and I think this is because the plastic is quite pliable unlike the hard plastic of the original. The only thing I wasn’t too happy about was the windows which, if put in correctly, make it look like a double glazing salesman has recently visited. I decided to reverse them (with the window sills on the inside) as I felt this gave less of a 20th century suburban look.

I’ve been mulling over some ideas on built-up-areas for Muskets & Marshals that I will expound upon at a later date.

14 comments:

Vintage Wargaming said...

Maybe you should really be looking for Triang Countryside rubber buildings...

Heinz-Ulrich von Boffke said...

It looks really good and not at all 20th century suburban. Can't wait to see it painted up.

Best Regards,

Stokes

Dave Vickers said...

I recently bought 2 of these, one built and one kit in the original plastic bag, if you are going for an authentic early 70's look these are a must! They will go well with my Merit plastic fir trees and hedges.

Dave Vickers said...

BTW would it be a huge problem re Muskets and Marshals if I based my infantry guys on 20mm deep bases? I prefer the look of this to 15mm deep, also it means bayonets project a little less so are less likely to get broken!

Anonymous said...

I love those old Airfix buildings and always enjoy my visits to your blog. I have found a hot glue gun works wonders when assembling kit buildings.

Cheers,
William H.

Stryker said...

Clive - although I agree that the rubber trees are old school I'm more after recreating scenic items in line with what I had in the early 70s hence Airfix and Superquick.

Dave - depth isn't too much of a problem in M&M as long as the frontage is correct. I personally like the mass effect so I like my troops to be as close together as possible. By careful positioning of the figures the 15mm deep bases are not really a problem.

Matt said...

Thanks for the pointer to Dapol! i think they will come in useful for Airfix Waterloo.

Ross Mac rmacfa@gmail.com said...

"still in production from a company called Dapol " ....Oh dear.

Stryker said...

Matt/Ross sorry about that but they are very nice little kits!

Conrad Kinch said...

I might have one or two of these...

....Dapol buildings are a bit of a weakness of mine.

Mark Dudley said...

My local model railway shop carries both the Dapol and Superquick ranges.

I have so far resisted temptation but think I will have to pay a visit soon.

The Dapol Country Inn and Windmill are also useful kits.

old john said...

Suggest you look out for old Airfix mags and Annuals as the late Terry Wise did a lot of articles on converting Airfix buildings for many periods, many years ago one i did was for a Sheriff's Office using the railway station, turned out well, the Waterloo buildings also very useful
cheers Old John

Stryker said...

Mark - as it happens I do have a windmill and have also been eyeing up the Country Inn on the Daopl website!

John - I have some ideas for converting the Airfix La Haye Sainte which I will be trying out soon.

Allan Tidmarsh said...

A classic bit of real estate :)