Thursday, 5 November 2015

Mounting up

The Hinton Hunt painting instructions for French Cuirassiers FN102 and FN310 state “Dark brown horses for the whole regiment except trumpeters” (click here to see the instructions on the Hinton Hunter).

When I first started painting Hinton Hunt’s back in the early 70s I had a very limited choice of colours being restricted to whatever Humbrols were available in the local model shop. At this time the range was very limited and I used the same Dark Earth Brown for everything – guns, packs, muskets, hair and of course horses.

So I’ve been in two minds about whether to paint them all the same shade of dark brown in tribute to my old army or if I should vary them a bit in a more realistic way. In the end I’ve gone for a bit of variation using all three shades of Foundry Bay Brown and I’m hoping that the overall finished effect will be dark enough.

20 comments:

Heinz-Ulrich von Boffke said...

Well, they look awfully good already in this photograph. Of course, a marmalade base coat works wonders when one applies the various colors over it. It's a little know painting secret in the wargaming world. of course

Best Regards,

Stokes

Stryker said...

Yes, I do find that marmalade gives better coverage than jam!

KEV. said...

Superb painting IAN. I just cannot paint that accurately - well done indeed! KEV.

Stryker said...

Thanks Kev!

paulalba said...

They look lovely Ian,
Have you read achtung panzer, the wargaming book? I think you would find it really interesting if you haven't!

paulalba said...

Sorry I meant this Ian,
http://www.amazon.co.uk/Achtung-Schweinehund-Story-Imaginary-Combat/dp/0349115680

Wellington Man said...

Very smart. I'm not jealous. No, not a all.

Stryker said...

Hi Paul - Yes I read it when it first came out a fantastic read (I must read it again). In fact some of the figures in my collection came from the author!

Matt - Well it's ok to be a bit jealous although your own collection has become something very much to envy!

'Lee. said...

Lovely work on those figures Ian, I know from having painted the two regiments for Roy that they are not easy to paint in terms of following lines and belts etc. Good choice of horse shades too.

MSFoy said...

Excellent - they will be a source of pride and delight to the Emperor. By the way - marmalade undercoat - it's important to remember not to use the Traditional Rough Cut, I have discovered.

Stryker said...

Thanks Lee.

Tony - no, I save the rough cut for my Highlanders!

Anonymous said...

Wonderful job and are they more French artillery in the background?

Paul

Stryker said...

We'll spotted Paul but not French they are in fact Dutch however I doubt if they will be fully kitted out for vintage Waterloo mainly because they are short of a cannon.

lewisgunner said...

And Lee did a lovely job on them.

if anything we would need more French guns to replicate the effect of Napoleon's Grand Battery. I am still amazed that he appears to have been aboe to deploy field guns just outside musket range as in a wargame the opposing infantry would advance on the guns, but I presume they had cover from cavalry or perhaps infantry.

Stryker said...

Roy - perhaps we should try that on the day?

the Archduke said...

mm. I remember trying that in a major post-Waterloo bash. My whole battery was caught up in a melee between opposing lancers and wiped out.

Stryker said...

Ah, but were these Austrian guns?

Anonymous said...

Lovely figures. I see that you glue the riders to a bottle top. I always find that the boots get damaged when I take them off. How do you avoid this?

the Archduke said...

No. Russian..........

Stryker said...

Anon - I've never had that problem, I use a small amount of superglue and then gently pull the figures off when painted. I then just chip off any glue attached to the boots using my fingernails. So far I haven't lost a boot just the odd fingernail...