Sunday, 29 March 2015

Horse Grenadier update

I finally sorted out the way I want to paint the Horse Grenadiers after studying several pictures on the internet to work out how best to do the lace. I resorted to this because even with the original Hinton Hunt painting instructions I found it very hard to make out what had been sculpted on the figure. I’m happy with it now even if it wasn’t exactly what Marcus Hinton intended when he created them.

Vintage Waterloo continues to take a fair bit of my time but at least all the figures are now with (or on their way to) their painters. It’s been great to involve others who appreciate these figures in the painting process and without them Roy and I would have little chance of putting on anything other than a skirmish game.

I’ve been thinking about ways to adapt and streamline my rules Muskets & Marshals for use in the game. Roy and I have never tried anything bigger than ten or so units per side and Vintage Waterloo is likely to have quite a few more than that. We also need to get a result within eight turns and of course it wouldn’t be Waterloo without a decent massed cavalry charge or two, an attack by the Old Guard and the arrival of the Prussians – quite a lot to fit into the time.

19 comments:

lewisgunner said...

Nice fclean figures Ian, The horse grenadiers of the guard have a queue at the back. Did they powder theitr hair in 1815?

Roy

Wellington Man said...

Very nicely done. Looking very belligerant!

Stryker said...

Thanks chaps.

Roy, I'm not sure but mine have!

Anonymous said...

Lovely, always like to see Guard cavalry, should look good leading a charge against the allied line.

Paul

Stryker said...

Yes, or perhaps standing neatly in reserve? Wouldn't like to see them get their uniforms grubby!

Matt said...

They look like they mean business!

Kev said...

You are certainly putting in a lot of excellent painting into the Waterloo Project- very much looking forward to the Historical Event. KEV.

Stryker said...

Cheers Kev!

'Lee. said...

Very nice Ian.

Ken said...

The horse Grenadiers have always been a fav of mine.

lewisgunner said...

They were all tall men on big horses. With the added height of the bearskin they must have looked truly impressive to an opponent.

Anonymous said...

Having seen some of the games on the blog with 10 x infantry and a couple of cavalry units plus artillery per side.

Approximately how many units will be taking part? What size table do you plan to use?

Paul

Stryker said...

Hi Paul - The final OOB and table layout is not decided yet but we're hoping to firm things up by the end of the month. At the moment it's looking like Anglo/Allied 14 foot, 7 cavalry. French 14 foot, 5 Guard and 7 cavalry. Prussians 8 foot, 4 cavalry. Cavalry units are 12 figures rather than 18 and each side will have 8 or so gun batteries.

I'm not sure about the table size as I haven't seen Roy's new wargame room yet but I imagine it will be around 12' x 5'. I'll post more info as I get it!

Anonymous said...

Wow, this should be some spectacle, looking forward to this

Paul

the Archduke said...

Ian, in a typical piece of Archdukery, can I ask what were the details that troubled you in the painting of the Horse Grenadiers? The outcome looks spot on to me, but then....

Stryker said...

Archduke - the bit that really bugged me was the lace on the right shoulder which was a bit of a blob. I'm happy with it now thought!

James Fisher, FINS said...

They look great Ian!
I agree, it's difficult to get the aurore and blue 'just right' for such a famous unit. I reckon that you have achieved it!

Stryker said...

Thanks James!

the Archduke said...

I have to agree with James. The invention of detail is part of the frustration but also part of the charm of Marcus' figures....and anyway, I did mine the same.......so you must be right.