Monday, 26 May 2014

The Great Redoubt (part 2)

The battle began with an artillery exchange - the French were trying to soften up the defenders in the redoubt whilst the Russians concentrated on the enemy infantry columns opposite their guns. The casualties soon started to mount, although of course the redoubt afforded the Russian defenders more protection than the open ground the French were occupying. On turn two Napoleon ordered his right flank to advance and the glittering French columns set off towards the waiting Russians.

The attacking French columns go forward on the right. The Swiss are taking heavy fire from artillery as they advance and early casualties included marshal Grouchy who was acting as their colonel.
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Voltigeurs push right up to the foot of the redoubt where they slowy start to cause casualties amongst the defenders.

As Napoleon's left flank was refused the Nassau grenadiers were forced to stand and take fire from the Russian guns. The very first shots killed their colonel and disordered the battalion eventually forcing it to retreat.

Murat was ordered to lead the light cavalry out past the Russian right flank.
 
A general view of the table after the first couple of turns (click on the image to zoom in). The French main attack can be seen in full swing on the right whilst the 105th and 45th ligne prepare to assault the redoubt in the centre The French left flank is refused but Murat's light cavalry (out of shot on the left) have been ordered to cause a diversion by threatening the Russian right.

Soon the voltigeurs and Jagers were popping away at each other between the lines and the Russian guns were starting to make some serious holes in the French columns. Meanwhile Roy kept his nerve making only a few minor adjustments to his line in preparation to receive the advancing enemy and despatching one each of his cavalry units to his flanks. At this stage I have to say that I was fairly confident that my advancing columns could break the Russian left but the centre dominated by the redoubt looked a tougher nut to crack.

The French right closes on the Russians. The heavy cavalry and guard horse artillery cover the flank of the attack whilst the 2nd guard grenadiers move up in support.
 
The skirmishers of both sides were hotly engaged.
 
The redoubt afforded the Russians good protection from the fire of the French but even so the sheer weight of lead caused a steady build up of casualties. 
 
The view from behind the Russian right showing the position of the guns that were bombarding the Nassauers. The battalion in the foreground are the Russian guard infantry.
 
Roy moves his lancers off to the right to counter the move made by Murat's cavalry. The pennants on the lances were a recent addition to this splendid looking unit.
 
 The Russian heavy cavalry meanwhile move to the left.

The battle was reaching a dramatic stage so it was time to break off for cheese on toast and freshly made lemon drizzle cake…

9 comments:

Heinz-Ulrich von Boffke said...

Looks like it's shaping up to be a near run thing! The lemon drizzle cake sounds awfully good too.

Best Regards,

Stokes

Stryker said...

Ah, Stokes - the lemon drizzle cake was well worth breaking off from the action for!

Matt said...

Stirring stuff Sir. I can almost smell the gunpowder (and melted cheese!).

Stryker said...

Yes, but it was good old cheddar, not French cheese...

Anonymous said...

It is looking close, but lemon drizzle cake is a thing of beauty that should not be missed!

Paul

'Lee. said...

Great stuff, some wonderful units on the table and a lively game.

MSFoy said...

No, no, no - CUT! - stale bread rubbed with garlic, not lemon-drizzle cake, for goodness sake…

Fantastic looking game - congrats! These shots with the actual sky in the background are so mind-blowing that I'm prepared to risk the wrath of the management and paint my dining room white, if that's what it takes.

Very nice, Ian - excellent. That Grouchy was always a dodgy prospect, btw...

Stryker said...

Tony - better still why not break out the oil paints and knock out a nice mural of the Spanish countryside on the dining room walls?

MSFoy said...

I like your thinking, young sir. Trouble is I'd have to commission someone who can handle a brush to do the artwork, and then I'd have to fight the ECW in a different room. Mind you, now I come to think about it...